through


through
through
There are two important uses which are still regarded as Americanisms but are beginning to make an impression on BrE:
1. As a preposition meaning ‘up to and including’, as in Monday through Friday. British speakers are aware of this use but still regard it as non-British, useful though it is:

• An eight-week summer program for disadvantaged children ages three through five —Dædalus, 1993.

2. As an adverb meaning ‘finished’, as in Are you through yet?. AmE might well say Are you through with the phone?, where BrE would prefer Have you finished with the phone? (Note that in BrE, in the context of telephones, Are you through yet? would normally be taken to mean ‘have you got a connection yet?’.) In AmE this use of through is often followed by a verbal noun: ‘

• I'm through eating, said my father, pushing his plate away —L. S. Schwartz, 1989.


Modern English usage. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Through — Through, prep. [OE. thurgh, [thorn]urh, [thorn]uruh, [thorn]oruh, AS. [thorn]urh; akin to OS. thurh, thuru, OFries. thruch, D. door, OHG. durh, duruh, G. durch, Goth. [thorn]a[ i]rh; cf. Ir. tri, tre, W. trwy. [root]53. Cf. {Nostril}, {Thorough} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Through — Through, a. Going or extending through; going, extending, or serving from the beginning to the end; thorough; complete; as, a through line; a through ticket; a through train. Also, admitting of passage through; as, a through bridge. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Through — Through, adv. 1. From one end or side to the other; as, to pierce a thing through. [1913 Webster] 2. From beginning to end; as, to read a letter through. [1913 Webster] 3. To the end; to a conclusion; to the ultimate purpose; as, to carry a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • through — I. preposition Etymology: Middle English thurh, thruh, through, from Old English thurh; akin to Old High German durh through, Latin trans across, beyond, Sanskrit tarati he crosses over Date: before 12th century 1. a. (1) used as a function word… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Through bolt — Through Through, a. Going or extending through; going, extending, or serving from the beginning to the end; thorough; complete; as, a through line; a through ticket; a through train. Also, admitting of passage through; as, a through bridge. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Through bridge — Through Through, a. Going or extending through; going, extending, or serving from the beginning to the end; thorough; complete; as, a through line; a through ticket; a through train. Also, admitting of passage through; as, a through bridge. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Through cold — Through Through, a. Going or extending through; going, extending, or serving from the beginning to the end; thorough; complete; as, a through line; a through ticket; a through train. Also, admitting of passage through; as, a through bridge. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • through stane — Through Through, a. Going or extending through; going, extending, or serving from the beginning to the end; thorough; complete; as, a through line; a through ticket; a through train. Also, admitting of passage through; as, a through bridge. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Through stone — Through Through, a. Going or extending through; going, extending, or serving from the beginning to the end; thorough; complete; as, a through line; a through ticket; a through train. Also, admitting of passage through; as, a through bridge. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Through ticket — Through Through, a. Going or extending through; going, extending, or serving from the beginning to the end; thorough; complete; as, a through line; a through ticket; a through train. Also, admitting of passage through; as, a through bridge. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Through train — Through Through, a. Going or extending through; going, extending, or serving from the beginning to the end; thorough; complete; as, a through line; a through ticket; a through train. Also, admitting of passage through; as, a through bridge. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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